Scientific References

PMS: Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) reduced PMS significantly at 100 mg and 200 mg per day.

This retrospective study of 630 women show ed that while 100 mg to 150 mg of supplemental vitamin B6 reduced PMS in about 66% of the women, 160 mg to 200 mg of Vitamin B6 reduced PMS in about 79% of the women. Brush MG, and associates. Pyridoxine in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome: a retrospective survey in 630 patients. British Journal of Clinical Practice 1988 Nov;42(11):448-52.

PMS: Vitamin D at a medium intake of 706 IU per day was associated with a 41 percent more decrease in PMS than 112 IU per day.

Looking at the vitamin D intake of Women in the Nurses’ Health Study II, this study concluded that women with a higher median vitamin D intake of 706 IU per day had significantly less (or no) PMS than subjects who got a median of the least amount of vitamin D, 112 IU per day. Bertone-Johnson, ER, et al. Calcium and vitamin D intake and risk of incident premenstrual syndrome. Archives of Internal Medicine 2005 Jun 13;165(11):1246-52.

PMS: Chaste tree berry (vitex) extract has been shown to reduce PMS.

This randomized placebo-controlled 3-month study of premenstrual syndrome in 170 women (average age 36) showed that 20 mg of chaste berry extract reduced PMS about 28% better than placebo. The women noted significant reductions in irritability, mood disturbances, anger, headache, and breast fullness compared to the placebo group. Schellenberg R, and associates. Treatment for the premenstrual syndrome with agnus castus ifruit extract: prospective, randomized, placebo controlled study. British Medical Journal 2001 Jan 20;322:134-137.

Calcium Carbonate Calcium carbonate at 1,000 mg per day reduced PMS.

This randomized placebo-controlled study of 78 women showed a 58 percent better reduction in PMS with 1,000 mg of calcium carbonate than with placebo during the luteal and menstrual phases of the reproductive cycle. Both water retention and pain scores were significantly reduced by calcium carbonate supplementation. Thys-Jacobs S, and associates. Calcium supplementation in premenstrual syndrome a randomized crossover trial. Journal of General Internal Medicine 1989;4(3):183-9.

PMS: Magnesium at 200 and 360 mg per day reduced PMS.

Two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies showed that magnesium at 360 mg per day reduced headaches and pain, and at 200 mg reduced weight gain, fluid retention, swelling of extremities, breast tenderness and abdominal bloating. Facchinetti F, and associates. Magnesium prophylaxsis of menstrual migraine: effects on intracellular magnesium. Headache 1991 May;31(5):298-301. Walker AF, and associates. Magnesium supplementation alleviates premenstrual symptoms of fluid retention. Journal of Womens Health 1998 Nov;7(9):1157-65.

PMS: Vitamin E was shown to reduce PMS in 15 categories of PMS.

This randomized, placebo-controlled study confirmed a previous study by the same author, showing that with 400 IU of natural form vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol) "all major categories of PMS symptoms are improved with supplementation of 400 IU of vitamin E daily." In all 15 categories of symptoms, vitamin E supplemented women reported 27-42% reduction in severity. London RS, and associates. Efficacy of alpha-tocopherol in the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome. Journal of Reproductive Medicine 1987 Jun;32(6):4004-4

STRONGER BONES: Vitamin D at higher doses reduced the rate of bone fractures.

A major review of scientific studies since 1960 found that 700-800 IU of supplemental vitamin D reduced bone fractures 23% to 26%, while 400 IU was not sufficient for fracture prevention.Bischoff-Ferrari H, and associates. Fracture prevention with vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of the American Medical Association 2005 May 11;293(18):2257-64.

STRONGER BONES: Vitamin K1 supplementation was associated with improved bone mineral density.

80 mcg/day of vitamin K1 improved carboxylated osteocalcin in postmenopausal women. This measure correlates with improved bone mineral density.Schaafsma A, and associates. Vitamin D3 and vitamin K1 supplementation of Dutch postmenopausal women with normal and low bone mineral densities: effects on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and carboxylated osteocalcin. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2000;54:626.

STRONGER BONES: Boron improved calcium and magnesium retention in the body and improved levels of bone-building hormones.

Boron, at 3 mg/day, has been shown to improve calcium retention in the body Nielsen FH, and associates. Effect of dietary boron on mineral, estrogen, and testosterone metabolism in postmenopausal women. FASEB Journal. 1987 Nov;1(5):394-7.

STRONGER BONES: Iron intake was associated with greater bone density in 5 bone types.

Iron intake at more than 20 mg/day when calcium intake was between 800 to 1200 mg/day was associated with greater bone mineral density in several types of bone in healthy nonsmoking postmenopausal women. The authors noted that iron was necessary for healthy bone collagen, which gives bone its flexibility and ability to absorb impact with reduced risk of fracture. Harris MM, and associates. Dietary iron is associated with bone mineral density in healthy postmenopausal women. Journal of Nutrition 133;3598-3602, 2003.

STRONGER BONES: Vitamin C supplementation increased spinal bone density.

Postmenopausal women who took 1,000 mg/day over a three-year time period had 5 percent greater spinal bone density than women who took 500 mg. Morton DJ, and associates. Vitamin C supplement use and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2001, 16:135-140.

STRONGER BONES: Magnesium increased the density of a major component of bone.

Magnesium dosing between 250 mg and 750 mg increased trabecular bone density between 1 and 8 percent for a majority of postmenopausal women in this 2-year study. Stendig-Lindberg G, and associates. Trabecular bone density in a two year controlled trial of peroral magnesium in osteoporosis. Magnesium Research. 1993 Jun;6(2):155-63.

STRONGER BONES: Calcium, zinc, manganese and copper, taken together, increased bone density.

Calcium (1,000 mg) with zinc (15 mg), manganese (5 mg) and copper (2.5 mg) increased bone density 5.01 percent better than placebo. Strause L, and associates. Spinal bone loss in postmenopausal women supplemented with calcium and trace minerals. Journal of Nutrition 1994 Jul;124(7):1060-4.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin D inadequacy in pregnancy.

This study said that previous vitamin D recommendations for pregnancy, 200 to 400 IU/day were too conservative and recommended considering the need for higher doses. Dror DK, Allen LH. Vitamin D inadequacy in pregnancy: biology, outcomes, and interventions. Nutrition Reviews 2010 Aug;68(8):465-77. Dror DK Allen LH. USDA ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Davis, California, 95616, USA. dkdror@ucdavis.edu

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin D improves the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This double blind trial of pregnant women showed that those who took 1,000 IU of vitamin D had twice as many babies born with healthier birth weights. Maxwell JD. Vitamin D supplements enhance weight gain and nutritional status in pregnant Asians. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1981 Oct;88(10):987-91.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Multivitamins improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study showed a small, significant increase in mean birth weight among infants of mothers receiving multiple micronutrients compared with infants of mothers receiving only iron-folic acid supplements. Larger micronutrient doses seemed to produce greater impact. Meaningful improvements were also observed in height and cognitive development of the children by 2 years of age. Shrimpton R, and associates. Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in developing-country settings: policy and program implications of the results of a meta-analysis. Food and Nutrition Bulletin 2009 Dec;30(4 Suppl):S556-73.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Antioxidants improve the chance of a healthy pregnancy.

This study said that antioxidants helped prevent hypertensive disorders in pregnant women that can affect the health of the newborn. Lin JH, and associates. Effect of antioxidants on amelioration of high-risk factors inducing hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Chinese Medical Journal (Engl). 2010 Sep;123(18):2548-2554.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Beta carotene improves the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

Vitamin A is essential for growth and differentiation of a number of cells and tissues. Notably during pregnancy and throughout the breastfeeding period, vitamin A has an important role in the healthy development of the fetus and the newborn, with lung development and maturation being particularly important. Stroben M, and associates. The importance of beta-carotene as a source of vitamin A with special regard to pregnant and breastfeeding women. European Journal of Nutrition 2007 Jul;46 Suppl 1:I1-20.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (1) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

Folic acid requirements are said to double during pregnancy. While 400 mcg of folic acid can reduce spina bifida birth defects by about 40 percent, this study also showed that 1000 mcg reduced birth defects by about 50 percent. Garcia-Morales MA, and associates. [Peri-conception use of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defect: current concepts] Ginecologia y Obstetricia de Mexico 1996 Sep;64:418-21. [Article in Spanish]

HEALTHIER BABIES: (2) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study also showed that folic acid could reduce the chances of neural tube birth defects. De-Regil LM, and associates. Effects and safety of periconceptional folate supplementation for preventing birth defects. Cochrane Database System Review. 2010 Oct 6;10:CD007950.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (3) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study said folic acid supplementation could reduce the risk of orofacial clefts in the baby. Wehby GL,;and associates. Folic acid and orofacial clefts: a review of the evidence. Oral Diseases 2010 Jan;16(1):11-9.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (4) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study said that folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of cleft lip This study said that folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of cleft lip.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Multivitamins improve the chances of a healthy baby.

The use of vitamin supplements in the first 4 months of pregnancy showed a protective effect against the occurrence of cleft palate. Loffredo LC, Souza JM, Freitas JA, Mossey PA. UNESP-Faculdade de Odontologia de Araraquara, Brazil. Oral clefts and vitamin supplementation. Cleft Palate Craniofacial Journal 2001 Jan;38(1):76-83.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (3) Calcium improve the chances of a healthy baby.

This study said that if women took supplemental calcium their babies were born with more bone mineral content. Koo WW, and associates. Maternal calcium supplementation and fetal bone mineralization. Obstetrics and Gynecololgy. 1999 Oct;94(4):577-82.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin D improve the chances of a healthy baby.

This study said that higher amounts of vitamin D than previously used should be considered for the healthiest outcome. Dror DK & Allen LH. Vitamin D inadequacy in pregnancy: biology, outcomes, and interventions. Nutrition Reviews 2010 Aug;68(8):465-77.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin A improve the chances of a healthy baby.

This study said that higher vitamin A intake from food and supplements reduced the risk of orofacial clefts. Johansen AM, and associates. Maternal dietary intake of vitamin A and risk of orofacial clefts: a population-based case-control study in Norway. American Journal of Epidemiology 2008 May 15;167(10):1164-70.

FULL-TERM Pregnancy: Multivitamins improve the chances of a full-term pregnancy

A study comparing women who did and did not take multi-vitamin supplements during the first and second trimester. The women who took multi-vitamins had lower premature delivery risk factors as follows: 1. Approximately 75% less risk for women who started taking multi-vitamins in the first trimester; 2. Approximately 50% less risk for women who started taking multi-vitamins in the second trimester. Scholl TO, and associates. Use of multivitamin/mineral prenatal supplements: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Epidemiology 1997 Jul 15;146(2):134-41.

FULL-TERM Pregnancy: Vitamin A improve the chances of a full-term pregnancy.

A study of 736 pregnant women showed that Vitamin A (retinol, not beta carotene) deficiency was associated with a 74 percent increased chance of premature delivery. Total Vitamin A intake from supplements should be at least 2,500 IU but not more than 10,000 IU during pregnancy. (The World Health Organization says “It is safe to give fertile women, independent of their vitamin A status, as much as 10,000 IU daily at any time during pregnancy.”) Radhika MS, and associates. Effects of vitamin A deficiency during pregnancy on maternal and child health. British Journal of Gynecology 2002 Jun;109(6):689-93.

FULL-TERM Pregnancy: Vitamin C improve the chances of a full-term pregnancy.

This study showed that pregnant women who had the most vitamin C intake (≥362 mg/day) from food and supplements had twice as much chance of a full-term pregnancy as women who consumed the least amount of vitamin C (<169 mg/day). Siega-Riz AM, and associates. Vitamin C intake and the risk of pre-term delivery. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology August 2003;189(2):519-525.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Vitamin D at 1,000 IU improves the chances of full birth weight.

This study showed that supplementation with 1,000 IU of Vitamin D3 per day resulted in almost twice as many babies with higher birth weights. Maxwell JD, and associates. Vitamin D supplements enhance weight gain and nutritional status in pregnant Asians. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1981 Oct;88(10):987-91.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Multivitamins taken in the first and second trimesters significantly improved the chances of full birth weight.

The study showed that women who took multi-vitamin supplements during the first and second trimester showed that there was 86% better chance of full birth weight when multivitamins were taken in the first trimester and 84% better chance of full birth weight when multi-vitamin use started in the second trimester Scholl TO, and associates. Use of multivitamin/mineral prenatal supplements: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1997 Jul 15;146(2):134-41.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Folic acid at 1,000 mcg improves the chances of full birth weight.

This study showed that supplementation with 400 mcg of folic acid or more per day resulted in lower homocysteine and higher birth weight as folic acid dosages increased Fryer AA, and associates. Quantitative, high-resolution epigenetic profiling of CpG loci identifies associations with cord blood plasma homocysteine and birth weight in humans. Epigenetics 6:1, 86-94; January 2011.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Iron at 30 mg or more improves the chances of full birth weight.

In this randomized placebo-controlled study of 513 prenatal women, 30 mg of iron per day resulted in significantly higher average birth weight and 77.7% fewer low-birth-weight babies delivered prematurely. Cogswell ME, and associates. Iron supplementation during pregnancy, anemia, and birth weight: a randomized controlled trial1,2,3 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 78, No. 4, 773-781, October 2003.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Zinc at 25 mg or more improves the chances of full birth weight.

This randomized placebo-controlled study of 580 pregnant women showed that women who took 25 mg of zinc per day had babies that weighed 4.5 ounces more than women who took no zinc. Goldenberg, RL, and associates. The effect of zinc supplementation on pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Medical Association. 1995;274(6):463-468.

ANTI-AGING: Vitamin D Supplementation Can Reduce Aches and Pains.

Addressing vitamin D deficiency can reduce aches and pains. Multiple Citations - please read the abstracts.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid Levels Improved Bone Mineral Density For Postmenopausal Women.

Two studies showed that higher levels of folic acid were associated with improved bone mineral density for postmenopausal women, the group of people who are most likely to lose bone. Folic acid most likely works well for people who have less problems with bone loss, such as younger women and men. Multiple Citations - please read the abstracts.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid Levels Improved Bone Mineral Density for Postmenopausal Women.

This study showed that folic acid intake was associated with better bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, the group of people who are most likely to lose bone. Folic acid most likely works well for people who have less problems with bone loss, such as younger women and men. Rejnmark L, and associates. Dietary intake of folate, but not vitamin B2 or B12, is associated with increased bone mineral density 5 years after the menopause: results from a 10-year follow-up study in early postmenopausal women. Calcified Tissue International. 2008 Jan;82(1):1-11. Epub 2008 Jan 4.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid improves memory.

All SuperNutrition multivitamins for adults provide 1,000 mcg of folic acid, the highest potency found in a multivitamin. This three-year double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 818 men and women, aged 50 to 70 years showed that, compared to placebo, those who took an 800 mcg folic acid supplement experienced about 13 percent better memory scores, about 8 percent better information processing speed and about 6 percent better sensorimotor speed. Durga, J and Associates. Effect of 3-year folic acid supplementation on cognitive function in older adults in the FACIT trial: a randomized, double blind, controlled trial. Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):208-16.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid improves memory.

Antioxidant vitamins and minerals significantly improved memory for people aged 45 to 60 years old. Read Abstract for full citation.

ANTI-AGING: Multivitamins improves Heart Health For Women.

Women who took a low dose one-daily multivitamin had significantly less chances of having a heart attack. Rautianen S, and associates. Multivitamin use and the risk of myocardial infarction: a population-based cohort of Swedish women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2010: doi 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29371

FOR MEN: Nutrients in SuperNutrition Formulas For Men That Improve Memory.

This multi-vitamin/mineral supplement improved memory for men 30 – 55 years old. Kennedy David O, and associates. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males. Psychopharmacology (2010) 211(1):55-68 DOI: 10.1007/s00213-010-1870-3.

FOR MEN: Nutrients that support better memory for older men.

This 2-year study of men 70 years and older showed that taking 800 mcg of folic acid, 500 mcg of vitamin B12 and 20 mg of vitamin B6 improved three different measures of memory. de Jager CA, and associates. Cognitive and clinical outcomes of homocysteine-lowering B-vitamin treatment in mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2011 Jul 21. doi: 10.1002/gps.2758. [Epub ahead of print]

FOR MEN: Nutrients That Support More Physical Strength in SuperNutrition Formulas For Men.

This multi-vitamin/mineral supplement improved cognitive performance under stress, including improved memory, with improved feelings of vigor, physical strength, energy and well-being with reduced feelings of mental and physical fatigue for healthy males, ages 30 - 55. Kennedy David O, and associates. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males. Psychopharmacology (2010) 211(1):55-68 DOI: 10.1007/s00213-010-1870-3.

FOR MEN: Reduced Fatigue - Men.

This multi-vitamin/mineral supplement improved cognitive performance under stress, including improved memory, with improved feelings of vigor, physical strength, energy and well-being with reduced feelings of mental and physical fatigue for healthy males, ages 30 - 55. Kennedy David O, and associates. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males. Psychopharmacology (2010) 211(1):55-68 DOI: 10.1007/s00213-010-1870-3.

PMS: Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) reduced PMS significantly at 100 mg and 200 mg per day.

This retrospective study of 630 women show ed that while 100 mg to 150 mg of supplemental vitamin B6 reduced PMS in about 66% of the women, 160 mg to 200 mg of Vitamin B6 reduced PMS in about 79% of the women. Brush MG, and associates. Pyridoxine in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome: a retrospective survey in 630 patients. British Journal of Clinical Practice 1988 Nov;42(11):448-52.

PMS: Vitamin D at a medium intake of 706 IU per day was associated with a 41 percent more decrease in PMS than 112 IU per day.

Looking at the vitamin D intake of Women in the Nurses’ Health Study II, this study concluded that women with a higher median vitamin D intake of 706 IU per day had significantly less (or no) PMS than subjects who got a median of the least amount of vitamin D, 112 IU per day. Bertone-Johnson, ER, et al. Calcium and vitamin D intake and risk of incident premenstrual syndrome. Archives of Internal Medicine 2005 Jun 13;165(11):1246-52.

PMS: Chaste tree berry (vitex) extract has been shown to reduce PMS.

This randomized placebo-controlled 3-month study of premenstrual syndrome in 170 women (average age 36) showed that 20 mg of chaste berry extract reduced PMS about 28% better than placebo. The women noted significant reductions in irritability, mood disturbances, anger, headache, and breast fullness compared to the placebo group. Schellenberg R, and associates. Treatment for the premenstrual syndrome with agnus castus ifruit extract: prospective, randomized, placebo controlled study. British Medical Journal 2001 Jan 20;322:134-137.

Calcium Carbonate Calcium carbonate at 1,000 mg per day reduced PMS.

This randomized placebo-controlled study of 78 women showed a 58 percent better reduction in PMS with 1,000 mg of calcium carbonate than with placebo during the luteal and menstrual phases of the reproductive cycle. Both water retention and pain scores were significantly reduced by calcium carbonate supplementation. Thys-Jacobs S, and associates. Calcium supplementation in premenstrual syndrome a randomized crossover trial. Journal of General Internal Medicine 1989;4(3):183-9.

PMS: Magnesium at 200 and 360 mg per day reduced PMS.

Two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies showed that magnesium at 360 mg per day reduced headaches and pain, and at 200 mg reduced weight gain, fluid retention, swelling of extremities, breast tenderness and abdominal bloating. Facchinetti F, and associates. Magnesium prophylaxsis of menstrual migraine: effects on intracellular magnesium. Headache 1991 May;31(5):298-301. Walker AF, and associates. Magnesium supplementation alleviates premenstrual symptoms of fluid retention. Journal of Womens Health 1998 Nov;7(9):1157-65.

PMS: Vitamin E was shown to reduce PMS in 15 categories of PMS.

This randomized, placebo-controlled study confirmed a previous study by the same author, showing that with 400 IU of natural form vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol) "all major categories of PMS symptoms are improved with supplementation of 400 IU of vitamin E daily." In all 15 categories of symptoms, vitamin E supplemented women reported 27-42% reduction in severity. London RS, and associates. Efficacy of alpha-tocopherol in the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome. Journal of Reproductive Medicine 1987 Jun;32(6):4004-4

STRONGER BONES: Vitamin D at higher doses reduced the rate of bone fractures.

A major review of scientific studies since 1960 found that 700-800 IU of supplemental vitamin D reduced bone fractures 23% to 26%, while 400 IU was not sufficient for fracture prevention.Bischoff-Ferrari H, and associates. Fracture prevention with vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of the American Medical Association 2005 May 11;293(18):2257-64.

STRONGER BONES: Vitamin K1 supplementation was associated with improved bone mineral density.

80 mcg/day of vitamin K1 improved carboxylated osteocalcin in postmenopausal women. This measure correlates with improved bone mineral density.Schaafsma A, and associates. Vitamin D3 and vitamin K1 supplementation of Dutch postmenopausal women with normal and low bone mineral densities: effects on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and carboxylated osteocalcin. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2000;54:626.

STRONGER BONES: Boron improved calcium and magnesium retention in the body and improved levels of bone-building hormones.

Boron, at 3 mg/day, has been shown to improve calcium retention in the body Nielsen FH, and associates. Effect of dietary boron on mineral, estrogen, and testosterone metabolism in postmenopausal women. FASEB Journal. 1987 Nov;1(5):394-7.

STRONGER BONES: Iron intake was associated with greater bone density in 5 bone types.

Iron intake at more than 20 mg/day when calcium intake was between 800 to 1200 mg/day was associated with greater bone mineral density in several types of bone in healthy nonsmoking postmenopausal women. The authors noted that iron was necessary for healthy bone collagen, which gives bone its flexibility and ability to absorb impact with reduced risk of fracture. Harris MM, and associates. Dietary iron is associated with bone mineral density in healthy postmenopausal women. Journal of Nutrition 133;3598-3602, 2003.

STRONGER BONES: Vitamin C supplementation increased spinal bone density.

Postmenopausal women who took 1,000 mg/day over a three-year time period had 5 percent greater spinal bone density than women who took 500 mg. Morton DJ, and associates. Vitamin C supplement use and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2001, 16:135-140.

STRONGER BONES: Magnesium increased the density of a major component of bone.

Magnesium dosing between 250 mg and 750 mg increased trabecular bone density between 1 and 8 percent for a majority of postmenopausal women in this 2-year study. Stendig-Lindberg G, and associates. Trabecular bone density in a two year controlled trial of peroral magnesium in osteoporosis. Magnesium Research. 1993 Jun;6(2):155-63.

STRONGER BONES: Calcium, zinc, manganese and copper, taken together, increased bone density.

Calcium (1,000 mg) with zinc (15 mg), manganese (5 mg) and copper (2.5 mg) increased bone density 5.01 percent better than placebo. Strause L, and associates. Spinal bone loss in postmenopausal women supplemented with calcium and trace minerals. Journal of Nutrition 1994 Jul;124(7):1060-4.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin D inadequacy in pregnancy.

This study said that previous vitamin D recommendations for pregnancy, 200 to 400 IU/day were too conservative and recommended considering the need for higher doses. Dror DK, Allen LH. Vitamin D inadequacy in pregnancy: biology, outcomes, and interventions. Nutrition Reviews 2010 Aug;68(8):465-77. Dror DK Allen LH. USDA ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Davis, California, 95616, USA. dkdror@ucdavis.edu

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin D improves the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This double blind trial of pregnant women showed that those who took 1,000 IU of vitamin D had twice as many babies born with healthier birth weights. Maxwell JD. Vitamin D supplements enhance weight gain and nutritional status in pregnant Asians. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1981 Oct;88(10):987-91.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Multivitamins improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study showed a small, significant increase in mean birth weight among infants of mothers receiving multiple micronutrients compared with infants of mothers receiving only iron-folic acid supplements. Larger micronutrient doses seemed to produce greater impact. Meaningful improvements were also observed in height and cognitive development of the children by 2 years of age. Shrimpton R, and associates. Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in developing-country settings: policy and program implications of the results of a meta-analysis. Food and Nutrition Bulletin 2009 Dec;30(4 Suppl):S556-73.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Antioxidants improve the chance of a healthy pregnancy.

This study said that antioxidants helped prevent hypertensive disorders in pregnant women that can affect the health of the newborn. Lin JH, and associates. Effect of antioxidants on amelioration of high-risk factors inducing hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Chinese Medical Journal (Engl). 2010 Sep;123(18):2548-2554.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Beta carotene improves the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

Vitamin A is essential for growth and differentiation of a number of cells and tissues. Notably during pregnancy and throughout the breastfeeding period, vitamin A has an important role in the healthy development of the fetus and the newborn, with lung development and maturation being particularly important. Stroben M, and associates. The importance of beta-carotene as a source of vitamin A with special regard to pregnant and breastfeeding women. European Journal of Nutrition 2007 Jul;46 Suppl 1:I1-20.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (1) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

Folic acid requirements are said to double during pregnancy. While 400 mcg of folic acid can reduce spina bifida birth defects by about 40 percent, this study also showed that 1000 mcg reduced birth defects by about 50 percent. Garcia-Morales MA, and associates. [Peri-conception use of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defect: current concepts] Ginecologia y Obstetricia de Mexico 1996 Sep;64:418-21. [Article in Spanish]

HEALTHIER BABIES: (2) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study also showed that folic acid could reduce the chances of neural tube birth defects. De-Regil LM, and associates. Effects and safety of periconceptional folate supplementation for preventing birth defects. Cochrane Database System Review. 2010 Oct 6;10:CD007950.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (3) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study said folic acid supplementation could reduce the risk of orofacial clefts in the baby. Wehby GL,;and associates. Folic acid and orofacial clefts: a review of the evidence. Oral Diseases 2010 Jan;16(1):11-9.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (4) Folic Acid improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

This study said that folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of cleft lip This study said that folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of cleft lip.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Multivitamins improve the chances of a healthy baby.

The use of vitamin supplements in the first 4 months of pregnancy showed a protective effect against the occurrence of cleft palate. Loffredo LC, Souza JM, Freitas JA, Mossey PA. UNESP-Faculdade de Odontologia de Araraquara, Brazil. Oral clefts and vitamin supplementation. Cleft Palate Craniofacial Journal 2001 Jan;38(1):76-83.

HEALTHIER BABIES: (3) Calcium improve the chances of a healthy baby.

This study said that if women took supplemental calcium their babies were born with more bone mineral content. Koo WW, and associates. Maternal calcium supplementation and fetal bone mineralization. Obstetrics and Gynecololgy. 1999 Oct;94(4):577-82.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin D improve the chances of a healthy baby.

This study said that higher amounts of vitamin D than previously used should be considered for the healthiest outcome. Dror DK & Allen LH. Vitamin D inadequacy in pregnancy: biology, outcomes, and interventions. Nutrition Reviews 2010 Aug;68(8):465-77.

HEALTHIER BABIES: Vitamin A improve the chances of a healthy baby.

This study said that higher vitamin A intake from food and supplements reduced the risk of orofacial clefts. Johansen AM, and associates. Maternal dietary intake of vitamin A and risk of orofacial clefts: a population-based case-control study in Norway. American Journal of Epidemiology 2008 May 15;167(10):1164-70.

FULL-TERM Pregnancy: Multivitamins improve the chances of a full-term pregnancy

A study comparing women who did and did not take multi-vitamin supplements during the first and second trimester. The women who took multi-vitamins had lower premature delivery risk factors as follows: 1. Approximately 75% less risk for women who started taking multi-vitamins in the first trimester; 2. Approximately 50% less risk for women who started taking multi-vitamins in the second trimester. Scholl TO, and associates. Use of multivitamin/mineral prenatal supplements: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Epidemiology 1997 Jul 15;146(2):134-41.

FULL-TERM Pregnancy: Vitamin A improve the chances of a full-term pregnancy.

A study of 736 pregnant women showed that Vitamin A (retinol, not beta carotene) deficiency was associated with a 74 percent increased chance of premature delivery. Total Vitamin A intake from supplements should be at least 2,500 IU but not more than 10,000 IU during pregnancy. (The World Health Organization says “It is safe to give fertile women, independent of their vitamin A status, as much as 10,000 IU daily at any time during pregnancy.”) Radhika MS, and associates. Effects of vitamin A deficiency during pregnancy on maternal and child health. British Journal of Gynecology 2002 Jun;109(6):689-93.

FULL-TERM Pregnancy: Vitamin C improve the chances of a full-term pregnancy.

This study showed that pregnant women who had the most vitamin C intake (≥362 mg/day) from food and supplements had twice as much chance of a full-term pregnancy as women who consumed the least amount of vitamin C (<169 mg/day). Siega-Riz AM, and associates. Vitamin C intake and the risk of pre-term delivery. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology August 2003;189(2):519-525.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Vitamin D at 1,000 IU improves the chances of full birth weight.

This study showed that supplementation with 1,000 IU of Vitamin D3 per day resulted in almost twice as many babies with higher birth weights. Maxwell JD, and associates. Vitamin D supplements enhance weight gain and nutritional status in pregnant Asians. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1981 Oct;88(10):987-91.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Multivitamins taken in the first and second trimesters significantly improved the chances of full birth weight.

The study showed that women who took multi-vitamin supplements during the first and second trimester showed that there was 86% better chance of full birth weight when multivitamins were taken in the first trimester and 84% better chance of full birth weight when multi-vitamin use started in the second trimester Scholl TO, and associates. Use of multivitamin/mineral prenatal supplements: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1997 Jul 15;146(2):134-41.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Folic acid at 1,000 mcg improves the chances of full birth weight.

This study showed that supplementation with 400 mcg of folic acid or more per day resulted in lower homocysteine and higher birth weight as folic acid dosages increased Fryer AA, and associates. Quantitative, high-resolution epigenetic profiling of CpG loci identifies associations with cord blood plasma homocysteine and birth weight in humans. Epigenetics 6:1, 86-94; January 2011.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Iron at 30 mg or more improves the chances of full birth weight.

In this randomized placebo-controlled study of 513 prenatal women, 30 mg of iron per day resulted in significantly higher average birth weight and 77.7% fewer low-birth-weight babies delivered prematurely. Cogswell ME, and associates. Iron supplementation during pregnancy, anemia, and birth weight: a randomized controlled trial1,2,3 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 78, No. 4, 773-781, October 2003.

BETTER BIRTH WEIGHT: Zinc at 25 mg or more improves the chances of full birth weight.

This randomized placebo-controlled study of 580 pregnant women showed that women who took 25 mg of zinc per day had babies that weighed 4.5 ounces more than women who took no zinc. Goldenberg, RL, and associates. The effect of zinc supplementation on pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Medical Association. 1995;274(6):463-468.

ANTI-AGING: Vitamin D Supplementation Can Reduce Aches and Pains.

Addressing vitamin D deficiency can reduce aches and pains. Multiple Citations - please read the abstracts.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid Levels Improved Bone Mineral Density For Postmenopausal Women.

Two studies showed that higher levels of folic acid were associated with improved bone mineral density for postmenopausal women, the group of people who are most likely to lose bone. Folic acid most likely works well for people who have less problems with bone loss, such as younger women and men. Multiple Citations - please read the abstracts.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid Levels Improved Bone Mineral Density for Postmenopausal Women.

This study showed that folic acid intake was associated with better bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, the group of people who are most likely to lose bone. Folic acid most likely works well for people who have less problems with bone loss, such as younger women and men. Rejnmark L, and associates. Dietary intake of folate, but not vitamin B2 or B12, is associated with increased bone mineral density 5 years after the menopause: results from a 10-year follow-up study in early postmenopausal women. Calcified Tissue International. 2008 Jan;82(1):1-11. Epub 2008 Jan 4.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid improves memory.

All SuperNutrition multivitamins for adults provide 1,000 mcg of folic acid, the highest potency found in a multivitamin. This three-year double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 818 men and women, aged 50 to 70 years showed that, compared to placebo, those who took an 800 mcg folic acid supplement experienced about 13 percent better memory scores, about 8 percent better information processing speed and about 6 percent better sensorimotor speed. Durga, J and Associates. Effect of 3-year folic acid supplementation on cognitive function in older adults in the FACIT trial: a randomized, double blind, controlled trial. Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):208-16.

ANTI-AGING: Folic Acid improves memory.

Antioxidant vitamins and minerals significantly improved memory for people aged 45 to 60 years old. Read Abstract for full citation.

ANTI-AGING: Multivitamins improves Heart Health For Women.

Women who took a low dose one-daily multivitamin had significantly less chances of having a heart attack. Rautianen S, and associates. Multivitamin use and the risk of myocardial infarction: a population-based cohort of Swedish women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2010: doi 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29371

FOR MEN: Nutrients in SuperNutrition Formulas For Men That Improve Memory.

This multi-vitamin/mineral supplement improved memory for men 30 – 55 years old. Kennedy David O, and associates. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males. Psychopharmacology (2010) 211(1):55-68 DOI: 10.1007/s00213-010-1870-3.

FOR MEN: Nutrients that support better memory for older men.

This 2-year study of men 70 years and older showed that taking 800 mcg of folic acid, 500 mcg of vitamin B12 and 20 mg of vitamin B6 improved three different measures of memory. de Jager CA, and associates. Cognitive and clinical outcomes of homocysteine-lowering B-vitamin treatment in mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2011 Jul 21. doi: 10.1002/gps.2758. [Epub ahead of print]

FOR MEN: Nutrients That Support More Physical Strength in SuperNutrition Formulas For Men.

This multi-vitamin/mineral supplement improved cognitive performance under stress, including improved memory, with improved feelings of vigor, physical strength, energy and well-being with reduced feelings of mental and physical fatigue for healthy males, ages 30 - 55. Kennedy David O, and associates. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males. Psychopharmacology (2010) 211(1):55-68 DOI: 10.1007/s00213-010-1870-3.

FOR MEN: Reduced Fatigue - Men.

This multi-vitamin/mineral supplement improved cognitive performance under stress, including improved memory, with improved feelings of vigor, physical strength, energy and well-being with reduced feelings of mental and physical fatigue for healthy males, ages 30 - 55. Kennedy David O, and associates. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males. Psychopharmacology (2010) 211(1):55-68 DOI: 10.1007/s00213-010-1870-3.

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